Saturday, August 5, 2017

Dussinger, Amanda - 1881

Obituary.
Amanda Dussinger
Mrs. Amanda, wife of Frank Dussinger, died at her residence at New Haven on Tuesday evening.  Her ailment was consumption, from which she suffered for a considerable length of time.  She is the mother of four small children.  Her age was 29 years.

Funeral services and interment at the New Haven Church this (Friday) morning at 10 o’clock.  Rev. J. Peter will officiate.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Amanda T. Dussinger.

Snyder, Catharine - 1881

Obituary.
Catharine Snyder.
On Sunday, August 28th, the mortal remains of Mrs. Catharine (Wolf) Snyder were borne to their last resting place at Bethany Reformed Church, Ephrata, of which she was for many years a consistent and active member.

She was afflicted with an affection of the heart for a number of years, and conscious of it as well as of its sudden and fatal termination, she expected that her earthly career would sooner or later end rather suddenly.  A kind Providence, however, determined otherwise.

A fever overtook her and ended her life in eight short days.  She realized her condition and prepared for it, which could not be otherwise consequent to such a life of earnestness and sincerity in the cause of Christ and His church.

That she was beloved and respected by all who knew her, could be readily seen in the immense concourse of people who gathered to pay the last tribute of respect to one whom they knew well for many years.

The spacious church edifice was crowded to its utmost capacity and it was with some effort that all could find room.  She attained the age of 58 years, 2 months, and 25 days.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Catharine Snyder.

Harpel, George W. (Dr.) - 1881

Dr. Geo. W. Harpel has located at Lititz, and is ready to attend to any department of Medicine.  Office, opposite the Sturgis House.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Weager, Joel - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Seamer, Solomon - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Shultz, Mr. - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Foltz, Samuel - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3


A Deer Hunt.--
Messrs. Josiah Snavely and Samuel Foltz, of this place, and Dr. M. U. Gerhard, of Lancaster, brother-in-law of the Rev. D. C. Tobais, left last Tuesday morning for the mountains beyond Lewistown for the purpose of hunting (for) deer.  They expect to be absent about two weeks.  We wish them abundant success, and know they will return pleased with their trip - provided they be not bitten by rattle-snakes.
~ The Lititz Record, 14-Oct-1881, Page 3, Column 1

You can visit the memorial page for Samuel Foltz.

Scheyer, Philip - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Smith, William - 1881

The Tobacco Boom
What The Weed Is Selling For And Why So Early.

A tobacco boom has burst forth throughout our entire county.  The country is overrun by buyers and the prices paid are such as to make the overprudent <sic> tobacco dealer’s head swim.  The failure of the tobacco crop in other parts of this State as well as in other States is the main cause of bringing buyers to the front at so early a season.

New York buyers have arrived in Lancaster in large numbers and have instructed their local agents to proceed to business.  Our buyers here among us are on the alert as well.  Wm. Smith, Philip Scheyer and Fry Bros. have also purchased considerable quantities.

There is a good deal of risk, both to the buyer and the seller, in bargaining for tobacco in the field or on the poles, and unless contracts are very carefully drawn, and very faithfully fulfilled, there is apt to be bad blood stirred up between the parties, and not unfrequently law suits.

Farmers of the weed are tickled to death at the prices which are being paid.  Mr. Samuel Foltz, of Warwick, sold his crop for 25 cents round.  It is nothing unusual to hear of sales at 25 cents through, and in several instances even larger sums have been paid.

Mr. Shultz, living near Washington borough, sold his crop at 30 cents through, and as it is a very heavy one and will yield at least 2,000 pounds to the acre, he will get at the rate of at least $600 per acre for it.

Three-fourths of the really extra lots in the county have already been bought.  A dozen of the Lancaster city dealers have so far secured about 5,000 cases between them, which may be regarded as very choice.  It is said that no finer, cleaner tobacco was ever grown in the county.  There is no let up in the demand, but the hunters are as eager and anxious now as they have been at any time since the “season” opened so auspiciously.

The firm of Joseph Mayer’s Sons last week purchased six hundred cases of this year’s tobacco, in the Earls.  They paid from twenty to thirty cents for wrappers, and for some lots purchased they paid from sixteen to eighteen cents round.

Solomon Seamer, of West Hempfield, on Saturday, sold his crop of two acres at 25 cents round.  Joel Weager, of West Earl, sold his entire crop for 25 cents through, and a neighbor for 27, 20, 10 and 3 cents.

The New Era of Lancaster, in speaking about growers selling their crops now, suggests that growers demand an advance of a specified sum from unknown purchasers.  There can be no doubt about the value of this suggestion, especially at the present time, when an unprecedented amount of tobacco is bought while still in the field or in the curing sheds.  The country is overrun with buyers at the present time.

Large prices, under the excitement of the hour, are freely offered and accepted for choice lots, and only the ordinary agreement is entered into between the sellers and buyers.  Now, in all seasons there are a few scalawags who go up and down the county, buying tobacco and making contracts, which are afterwards repudiated; in fact, these men merely speculate upon the varying changes of the market; if the latter proves favorable they stick to their bargains, and when unfavorable they repudiate them.

Of course, there are but a few of these characters, but they are sufficient in number to occasion a good deal of loss to our tobacco farmers, and we have had to allude to some of their doings every season.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Beck, A. R. - 1881

Our Schools-
As we go to press to-day (Thursday) everything is in a state of uproar and excitement in the vicinity of the public schools of Lititz.  The teachers are on hand, apparently sharpened up for the long term before them.  The children, with arms full of books, slates, &c., generally seem to be anxious to resume their studies.  There are so many changes to be made, so many promotions and a number of new faces, that it will require some days before everything will be in proper working order.

The Grammar School will occupy one-half of the floor of what was formerly Orchestra Hall.  The dividing partition between the two main rooms of this floor is arranged with sliding doors almost the entire length.  The room as well as the stairways leading thereto have been repainted.  The school room has been furnished with forty new patent desks, and the entire appearance of the place is cheerful and inviting.  The teacher, Miss I. H. Bruckart, will no doubt enter upon her duties in such pleasant quarters with pride.

The First Primary opened with 32 scholars; Second Primary, 27; Secondary, 38; Intermediate, 22; Grammar School, 23; total, 152.

Linden Hall Seminary will open its Fall term on Tuesday next.  The principal, Rev. H. A. Brickenstein, informed us that the outlook is encouraging.  There will be fully as many scholars as there were last term.  The institution closed last June with fifty-five pupils, besides a number of day scholars.  The graduating class, however, not be as large as that of last year.

Lititz Academy will open also on Tuesday nest, under the management of Mr. Geo. Hepp.  A commodious room has been fitted up in Mr. Hepp’s dwelling, in which a limited number of pupils will be received.  Mr. Hepp has a number of applications, but says it is difficult to tell how many scholars will be present on the opening day.

Audobon Villa, Mr. A. R. Beck, principal, will open on the 14th inst.  Mr. Beck’s school has such a good reputation, and his practical and systematic way of teaching and training boys, is such that he will have no trouble in obtaining the usual number of pupils.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 2

Hepp, George - 1881

Our Schools-
As we go to press to-day (Thursday) everything is in a state of uproar and excitement in the vicinity of the public schools of Lititz.  The teachers are on hand, apparently sharpened up for the long term before them.  The children, with arms full of books, slates, &c., generally seem to be anxious to resume their studies.  There are so many changes to be made, so many promotions and a number of new faces, that it will require some days before everything will be in proper working order.

The Grammar School will occupy one-half of the floor of what was formerly Orchestra Hall.  The dividing partition between the two main rooms of this floor is arranged with sliding doors almost the entire length.  The room as well as the stairways leading thereto have been repainted.  The school room has been furnished with forty new patent desks, and the entire appearance of the place is cheerful and inviting.  The teacher, Miss I. H. Bruckart, will no doubt enter upon her duties in such pleasant quarters with pride.

The First Primary opened with 32 scholars; Second Primary, 27; Secondary, 38; Intermediate, 22; Grammar School, 23; total, 152.

Linden Hall Seminary will open its Fall term on Tuesday next.  The principal, Rev. H. A. Brickenstein, informed us that the outlook is encouraging.  There will be fully as many scholars as there were last term.  The institution closed last June with fifty-five pupils, besides a number of day scholars.  The graduating class, however, not be as large as that of last year.

Lititz Academy will open also on Tuesday nest, under the management of Mr. Geo. Hepp.  A commodious room has been fitted up in Mr. Hepp’s dwelling, in which a limited number of pupils will be received.  Mr. Hepp has a number of applications, but says it is difficult to tell how many scholars will be present on the opening day.

Audobon Villa, Mr. A. R. Beck, principal, will open on the 14th inst.  Mr. Beck’s school has such a good reputation, and his practical and systematic way of teaching and training boys, is such that he will have no trouble in obtaining the usual number of pupils.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 2

Brickenstein, H. A. (Rev.) - 1881

Our Schools-
As we go to press to-day (Thursday) everything is in a state of uproar and excitement in the vicinity of the public schools of Lititz.  The teachers are on hand, apparently sharpened up for the long term before them.  The children, with arms full of books, slates, &c., generally seem to be anxious to resume their studies.  There are so many changes to be made, so many promotions and a number of new faces, that it will require some days before everything will be in proper working order.

The Grammar School will occupy one-half of the floor of what was formerly Orchestra Hall.  The dividing partition between the two main rooms of this floor is arranged with sliding doors almost the entire length.  The room as well as the stairways leading thereto have been repainted.  The school room has been furnished with forty new patent desks, and the entire appearance of the place is cheerful and inviting.  The teacher, Miss I. H. Bruckart, will no doubt enter upon her duties in such pleasant quarters with pride.

The First Primary opened with 32 scholars; Second Primary, 27; Secondary, 38; Intermediate, 22; Grammar School, 23; total, 152.

Linden Hall Seminary will open its Fall term on Tuesday next.  The principal, Rev. H. A. Brickenstein, informed us that the outlook is encouraging.  There will be fully as many scholars as there were last term.  The institution closed last June with fifty-five pupils, besides a number of day scholars.  The graduating class, however, not be as large as that of last year.

Lititz Academy will open also on Tuesday nest, under the management of Mr. Geo. Hepp.  A commodious room has been fitted up in Mr. Hepp’s dwelling, in which a limited number of pupils will be received.  Mr. Hepp has a number of applications, but says it is difficult to tell how many scholars will be present on the opening day.

Audobon Villa, Mr. A. R. Beck, principal, will open on the 14th inst.  Mr. Beck’s school has such a good reputation, and his practical and systematic way of teaching and training boys, is such that he will have no trouble in obtaining the usual number of pupils.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 2

Bruckart, I. H. - 1881

Our Schools-
As we go to press to-day (Thursday) everything is in a state of uproar and excitement in the vicinity of the public schools of Lititz.  The teachers are on hand, apparently sharpened up for the long term before them.  The children, with arms full of books, slates, &c., generally seem to be anxious to resume their studies.  There are so many changes to be made, so many promotions and a number of new faces, that it will require some days before everything will be in proper working order.

The Grammar School will occupy one-half of the floor of what was formerly Orchestra Hall.  The dividing partition between the two main rooms of this floor is arranged with sliding doors almost the entire length.  The room as well as the stairways leading thereto have been repainted.  The school room has been furnished with forty new patent desks, and the entire appearance of the place is cheerful and inviting.  The teacher, Miss I. H. Bruckart, will no doubt enter upon her duties in such pleasant quarters with pride.

The First Primary opened with 32 scholars; Second Primary, 27; Secondary, 38; Intermediate, 22; Grammar School, 23; total, 152.

Linden Hall Seminary will open its Fall term on Tuesday next.  The principal, Rev. H. A. Brickenstein, informed us that the outlook is encouraging.  There will be fully as many scholars as there were last term.  The institution closed last June with fifty-five pupils, besides a number of day scholars.  The graduating class, however, not be as large as that of last year.

Lititz Academy will open also on Tuesday nest, under the management of Mr. Geo. Hepp.  A commodious room has been fitted up in Mr. Hepp’s dwelling, in which a limited number of pupils will be received.  Mr. Hepp has a number of applications, but says it is difficult to tell how many scholars will be present on the opening day.

Audobon Villa, Mr. A. R. Beck, principal, will open on the 14th inst.  Mr. Beck’s school has such a good reputation, and his practical and systematic way of teaching and training boys, is such that he will have no trouble in obtaining the usual number of pupils.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 2

Sturgis, Edward - 1881

Personal-
Miss Della Rauch, of Philadelphia, is in town, stopping with her uncle, Edward Sturgis.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Rauch, Della - 1881

Personal-
Miss Della Rauch, of Philadelphia, is in town, stopping with her uncle, Edward Sturgis.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Enck, Isaac - 1881

Personal-
Mr. Augustus Enck, of this place, and his brother Isaac of Lexington, are visiting friends in Cumberland county.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Enck, Augustus - 1881

Personal-
Mr. Augustus Enck, of this place, and his brother Isaac of Lexington, are visiting friends in Cumberland county.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Herr, Joseph C. - 1881

Personal-
Mr. Joseph C. Herr, of Philadelphia, was in town this week.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Zimmerman, R. M. - 1881

Personal-
Mr. R. M. Zimmerman, of Harrisburg, was in town this week.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Meyers, Alice - 1881

Personal-
Miss Alice Meyers, of Bareville, is in town, stopping with Miss Anna Evans.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Milchsack, William - 1881

Personal-
Mr. Wm. Milchsack has returned from a two months’ vacation in the mountains of Monroe county.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

The Wedding. --
A very select audience of invited guests, numbering about one hundred and fifty, assembled in the Moravian Church, Tuesday evening last, to witness the wedding festivities of Mr. S. F. Van Vleck and Miss E. T. Miller – Wm. Milchsack and C. W. Grosh acting as ushers.

At precisely 6:30 o’clock Mr. J. Fred. Wolle, of Bethlehem, presiding at the organ, began playing a beautiful prelude step, when the Rev. Bishop H. J. Van Vleck, father of the groom, accompanied by Rev. Chas. Nagle, pastor of the church, made their appearance from the chapel.  Presently the two-to-be-made happy persons walked up the aisle of the church, in a dignified and graceful manner, preceded by the ushers, and taking their places in front of the Reverend gentlemen, Rev. Nagle read the service, whereupon Bishop Van Vleck propounded the usual questions, and in a very impressive manner closed the ceremony, after which the Mendelsson “Wedding March” was played.

No reception was held.  The happy pair, accompanied by the Bishop, took the 7:25 train for Lancaster; from that point they started for Mr. Van Vleck’s former home, in Ohio.
~ The Lititz Record, 23-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 3

Harmes, H. O. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Kafroth, Samuel - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Brubaker, E. B. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Boyd, C. G. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Geyer, George S. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Rothsville News.--
Mr. George S. Geyer has his property advertised for public sale on Saturday, October 8th.
~ The Lititz Record, 30-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Register of Sales
The following is a list of sales, for which bills have been printed at this office.  Persons wishing Sale Bills printed will find those turned out at the Record Office equal to any printed anywhere else.  All sales for which bills have been printed at this office will be noticed in this paper free from the time they are handed in until the week of the sale.
Oct. 8 -- In the village of Ephrata, 25 head of Ohio Cows, by Frank S. Brubaker.
Oct. 8 -- In the village of Rothsville, Warwick twp., 5 acres of land, with entirely new improvements thereon, by Geo. S. Geyer.
Oct. 15 -- In Manheim twp., 4 acres of land, with improvements thereon, by A. B. Reidenbach, agent for J. F. Frueauff.
Oct. 14 -- In the village of New Haven, a lot of ground with improvements; also a lot of land without improvements, by Samuel Grube.
Oct. 20 -- In the borough of Lebanon, five houses, two lots and timber land, by J. A. Roebuck, Dan’l Roebuck and P. J. Roebuck.
Oct. 22 -- In Lititz, Kemper’s coal and lumber yard; also 157 perches of land, by L.G. Kemper.
~ The Lititz Record, 07-Oct-1881, Page 2, Column 4

Buch, J. A. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1


Items of Interest
The New Era says that a charter was granted on Tuesday to the Stevens Beneficial Association, of Lititz, for the benefit of unmarried persons.  The petitioners for the charter were A. B. Reidenbach, F. B. Buch, M. M. Fry, H. H. Tshundy, J. G. Weltmer and J. A. Buch.
~ The Lititz Record, 30-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 6

White, J. A. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Wolle, R. N. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Erb, Henry S. - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Cameron, Colin - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Regennas, William - 1881

Jurors Drawn.- The following is a list of jurors drawn from this vicinity to serve in common pleas courts and quarter sessions:
Oct. 3 -- Wm. Regennas, Lititz; Colin Cameron, Elizabeth; Henry S. Erb, Penn.
Oct. 10 -- R. N. Wolle, Lititz; J. A. White, Penn; J. A. Buch, Lititz
Oct. 17 – Geo. S. Geyer, Warwick; C. G. Boyd, Penn; E. B. Brubaker, Elizabeth.
Oct. 24 – Sam’l Kafroth, Warwick; H. O. Harmes, Warwick.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Gantz, William - 1881

Real Estate Sales.-
The property of Lewis Demmy, situated between Brunnerville and Pine Hill, was sold to William Gantz for $2200.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Demmy, Lewis - 1881

Real Estate Sales.-
The property of Lewis Demmy, situated between Brunnerville and Pine Hill, was sold to William Gantz for $2200.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Gantz, Jacob (Mrs.) - 1881

Real Estate Sales.-
The property of Levi Books, situated in the village of Lexington, was sold to Mrs. Jacob Gantz, of Pine Hill, for $2,000.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Books, Levi - 1881

Real Estate Sales.-
The property of Levi Books, situated in the village of Lexington, was sold to Mrs. Jacob Gantz, of Pine Hill, for $2,000.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 1

Bricker, Owen P. - 1881

Assignees’ Notice
Assigned Estate of John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, Lancaster county.
John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, having by deed of voluntary assignment dated August 16th, 1881, assigned and transferred all their estate and effects to the undersigned, for the benefit of the creditors of the said John Breneman, he therefore gives notice to all persons indebted to said assignor, to make payment to the undersigned without delay, and those having claims to present them to
Francis W. Christ
                Hiram Brubaker
Owen P. Bricker, Att’y    Assignees,        Lititz, Pa.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 5


Owen P. Bricker, attorney-at-law, is in town every Saturday evening and Monday morning and can be consulted on legal business.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Owen Petersen Bricker.

Brubaker, Hiram - 1881

Assignees’ Notice
Assigned Estate of John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, Lancaster county.
John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, having by deed of voluntary assignment dated August 16th, 1881, assigned and transferred all their estate and effects to the undersigned, for the benefit of the creditors of the said John Breneman, he therefore gives notice to all persons indebted to said assignor, to make payment to the undersigned without delay, and those having claims to present them to
Francis W. Christ
                Hiram Brubaker
Owen P. Bricker, Att’y    Assignees,        Lititz, Pa.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 5


The Tobacco Market-
The tobacco market continues active and without abatement.  Some of the buyers look at field purchases as being rather premature, and would not at first listen to such a way of doing business.  Now, however, they are beginning to see that unless they, too, enter the field they will be left behind and will not be able to procure any choice crops.

Our half-dozen or more buyers are all active and anxious to secure a certain share of this year’s growth and not a stone is left unturned to secure choice crops if they can be had.  Teller Bros. representative is out from morning till night and is making purchases right and left.  Fry Bros., who had discontinued for a week or so, are again out, besides a number of others.

The following are some of the crops sold in different parts of this township: Addison Lutz, one-half acre at 22, 8 and 3; Manelius Ressler, 3 acres at 12 round; Levi Heffner, 1 acre at 10 round; Silas Zell, 1 acre at 10 round; John Wolf, 1 acre at 10 round; Mrs. John Badegum, 1 acre at 10 round; Alphus Leib, 2 acres at 25, 10, 6 and 3; Frank G. Buch, 2 acres at 11 ½ round; Chas. Hemple, 1 ¼ acres at 20, 10 and 3; John Wolf, ½ acre at 12 round; Wm. Gable, 1 ½ acres at 30, 16, 8 and 3; David Buch and Daniel Bowman, 2 acres at 29, 10 and 3; Reuben Griosh, ½ acre at 15 round; Jos. Kryder, 7 ½ acres at 15; Dan’l Burkholder, -- acres at 27, 8, 5 and 3; Hiram Brubaker, -- acres at 30, 10, 8 and 3; Jacob Kauffman, 2 acres at 30, 12, 8 and 3; Urias Buch, 2 acres at 25, 8 and 3.

Menno M. Fry & Bro. have made the following purchases: Reuben Risser, 1 ¾ acres at 27, 10 and 3; Samuel Bingeman, 1 ½ acres at 30, 12, 6 and 3; Ben. Wissler, 2 acres at 25, 10 and 3; Levi H. Wissler, 1 acre at 24, 10 and 3; Jonas Wechter, 1 3/4 acres at 28, 10, 6 and 3; Levallan Edwards, 1/2 acre at 25, 12 1/2, 6 and 3; H. S. Enck, 1/2 acre at 25, 12 and 3; George Erhart, 1/4 acre at 25, 12 and 3; John H. Brubaker, 1/2 acre at 23, 10 and 3; Jonas Eberly, 1/2 acre at 25, 10 and 3; Henry Leed, 2 1/2 acres at 25, 10 and 3.
~ The Lititz Record, 23-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 3

Christ, Francis W. - 1881

Assignees’ Notice
Assigned Estate of John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, Lancaster county.
John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, having by deed of voluntary assignment dated August 16th, 1881, assigned and transferred all their estate and effects to the undersigned, for the benefit of the creditors of the said John Breneman, he therefore gives notice to all persons indebted to said assignor, to make payment to the undersigned without delay, and those having claims to present them to
Francis W. Christ
                Hiram Brubaker
Owen P. Bricker, Att’y    Assignees,        Lititz, Pa.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 5

Breneman, John - 1881

Assignees’ Notice
Assigned Estate of John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, Lancaster county.
John Breneman and wife, of Warwick township, having by deed of voluntary assignment dated August 16th, 1881, assigned and transferred all their estate and effects to the undersigned, for the benefit of the creditors of the said John Breneman, he therefore gives notice to all persons indebted to said assignor, to make payment to the undersigned without delay, and those having claims to present them to
Francis W. Christ
                Hiram Brubaker
Owen P. Bricker, Att’y    Assignees,        Lititz, Pa.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 5

Dommy, Jacob L. - 1881

Stray Heifer
Came to the premises of the undersigned, the village of Rome, Warwick township, on Monday, July 4th, 1881, a red and white spotted heifer.  The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay expenses and take the animal away.
Jacob L. Dommy.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 4

Yeakel, Reuben - 1881

Struck A Bonanza.--  George M. Yeakel, son of Reuben Yeakel, of Lexington, who about a year ago went to Colorado, has been in luck.  In prospecting some time ago near Irvin Ruby Camp he discovered three silver mines, one of which is a very good one.  He has also found iron and zinc.  He believes he has struck a bonanza and intends to hold on to the mines until he can sell to advantage.  He says “it makes a poor devil like me, feel good to strike a good mine.”  We hope he may reap a fortune.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 3

Yeakel, George M. - 1881

Struck A Bonanza.--  George M. Yeakel, son of Reuben Yeakel, of Lexington, who about a year ago went to Colorado, has been in luck.  In prospecting some time ago near Irvin Ruby Camp he discovered three silver mines, one of which is a very good one.  He has also found iron and zinc.  He believes he has struck a bonanza and intends to hold on to the mines until he can sell to advantage.  He says “it makes a poor devil like me, feel good to strike a good mine.”  We hope he may reap a fortune.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 3

Helmick, F. W. - 1881

“God Bless the Little Woman.”-- F. W. Helmick, music publisher, 180b Elm street, Cincinnati, O., has just published one of the most beautiful songs that has of late years come to this office.  Everybody ought to buy it and everybody ought to sing it.  It refers to the noble wife of President Garfield, who has stood by her husband during the terrible struggle for life in which he has been engaged since July 2, cheering him, encouraging him, to keep steady, persevere, and he would yet conquer.  This song is easily arranged so that all players on the piano or organ can master it with perfect ease.  Price, 35 cents per copy; or four copies for $1.00.  Address all orders to F. W. Helmick, music publisher, 180 Elm street, Cincinnati, O.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 3

Mayer, David M. - 1881

Receive A Contract
The directors of the Manheim and Penn township turnpike company met at the office of their solicitor, A. F. Hostetter, esq., to receive bids for making two and five-eighths miles of their turnpike, commencing at the northern terminus of the Lancaster and Fruitville pike, and ending at a point on the old Manheim road.  There were three bids handed in: S. A. Danner, Lititz; Smith, Shaub & Co., of Lancaster, and David M. Mayer, of Manheim township.  All of these were considered too high by the board and were rejected.  Later in the afternoon Mr. Danner offered to make the turnpike for $10,250.  He was awarded the contract.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 2

Danner, S. A. - 1881

Receive A Contract
The directors of the Manheim and Penn township turnpike company met at the office of their solicitor, A. F. Hostetter, esq., to receive bids for making two and five-eighths miles of their turnpike, commencing at the northern terminus of the Lancaster and Fruitville pike, and ending at a point on the old Manheim road.  There were three bids handed in: S. A. Danner, Lititz; Smith, Shaub & Co., of Lancaster, and David M. Mayer, of Manheim township.  All of these were considered too high by the board and were rejected.  Later in the afternoon Mr. Danner offered to make the turnpike for $10,250.  He was awarded the contract.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 2

Hostetter, A. F. - 1881

Receive A Contract
The directors of the Manheim and Penn township turnpike company met at the office of their solicitor, A. F. Hostetter, esq., to receive bids for making two and five-eighths miles of their turnpike, commencing at the northern terminus of the Lancaster and Fruitville pike, and ending at a point on the old Manheim road.  There were three bids handed in: S. A. Danner, Lititz; Smith, Shaub & Co., of Lancaster, and David M. Mayer, of Manheim township.  All of these were considered too high by the board and were rejected.  Later in the afternoon Mr. Danner offered to make the turnpike for $10,250.  He was awarded the contract.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 2


Real Estate Transactions.--
Ritter estate: Lititz bakery to Dr. J. Shenk for $2750.  Meadow lot in Lititz to Benj. Lutz, for $660.  House and lot near the railroad, to Emmanuel Kauffman for $1430.  Six acres of timber land situate in Penn township, to J. Ritter for $60.25 an acre.  Lititz mill, in Rome, to A. W. Shober for $8035.  Farm of 63 acres, to John Evans at $210 an acre.  14 acres of land with improvements, to Jacob L. Stehman for $4000.  One-third of 840 acres of Iowa prairie land, to A. F. Hostetter, of Lancaster, for $251.  One-third of two lots in Webster City, Iowa, to A. F. Hoestetter, of Lancaster, for $76.  One-fifth of 69 lots is <sic> Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Graybill  Baer for $104.

Assigned estate of Michael Behmer, in New Haven, house and lot to Tobias Martin for $1800.

The farm of Jacob Gantz, deceased, of Pine Hill, was sold to Benj. B. Lehman for $75 an acre.  The farm comprises 90 acres.  Another lot of land, 5 acres, was sold to Frank Gantz for $2080.
~ The Lititz Record, 30-Sept-1881, Page 3, Column 4

Rudy, Martin - 1881

Martin Rudy, of Lancaster, bicycle expert, rode to Mt. joy on Sunday, thence to Marietta and Columbia, and returned to Lancaster, having made a trip of 44 miles between 6:30 A. M. 12:30 P. M.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 2