Sunday, July 30, 2017

Griggs, Kate - 1881

Just how much or in what manner a woman ought to adorn herself is a personal question.  If she wears diamonds abroad to the sacrifice of comfort at home it is none of the public’s business.  She should be queen of her boudoir.  But when in the effort to retain or secure good looks she brings about her own death her story should be told for the benefit of her sex and kind.  Two fatal cases of blood-poisoning from the use of “beautifying” mixtures have come to light within the last few days.  Miss Alice Lamont, of St. Louis, bathed herself in some quack ointment and shortly afterwards died from lead poison in the blood.  Mrs. Kate Griggs has just died at Long Branch from the use of an “anti-fat” medicine.  She confessed to have taken eighteen bottles of the stuff within ten months.  If those who seek to help nature along with cosmetics and drugs do not find a warning in such cases as come to the surface it may be well for them to further consider that there are scores of similar cases of which the public never hears.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Lamont, Alice - 1881

Just how much or in what manner a woman ought to adorn herself is a personal question.  If she wears diamonds abroad to the sacrifice of comfort at home it is none of the public’s business.  She should be queen of her boudoir.  But when in the effort to retain or secure good looks she brings about her own death her story should be told for the benefit of her sex and kind.  Two fatal cases of blood-poisoning from the use of “beautifying” mixtures have come to light within the last few days.  Miss Alice Lamont, of St. Louis, bathed herself in some quack ointment and shortly afterwards died from lead poison in the blood.  Mrs. Kate Griggs has just died at Long Branch from the use of an “anti-fat” medicine.  She confessed to have taken eighteen bottles of the stuff within ten months.  If those who seek to help nature along with cosmetics and drugs do not find a warning in such cases as come to the surface it may be well for them to further consider that there are scores of similar cases of which the public never hears.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Guiteau, Charles Julius - 1881

There is no other man in America so universally despised, so universally abhorred, as Charles J. Guiteau.  He is imprisoned for shooting down the Executive Head of the government.  And yet in such sacred regard is human life held in this country that the army and the navy are already put in requisition to protect the life of this execrated miscreant and to secure him a fair and impartial trial.  Verily, the equality and fairness of our institutions are not an idle and empty boast, but an invaluable reality.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

You can visit the memorial page for Charles Julius Guiteau.

Erb, Hiram L. - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Given, W. B. - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Grier, Hays - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Collius, Abraham - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Lightner, John L. - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Hildebrand, Martin - 1881

At the Democratic County Convention, held at Lancaster on Wednesday, Martin Hildebrand, of Mt. Joy, was nominated for County Commissioner, and John L. Lightner, of Lampeter, for County Auditor.  The delegates to the State Convention from the Northern District are Abraham Collius, of Marietta, Hays Grier and W. B. Given, of Columbia, and Hiram L. Erb, of Clay.  A full county ticket was nominated, but we have been unable to obtain the names at the time of going to press.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1

Garfield, James Abram - 1881

President Garfield, the nation’s patient, who was at the point of death the latter part of last week, has again improved and last accounts are that there is increasing hope.  All the symptoms are encouraging and there is no apprehension of relapse.  There is talk of moving him to other and more healthy quarters, but that cannot well be done.
~ The Lititz Record, 02-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 1


The President Dead
After Eighty Days Of Severe Suffering President James A. Garfield Passes Away

At thirty-five minutes after ten on Monday night, September 91, President James A. Garfield breathed his last.  He died at Long Branch, where he had been taken several weeks before his death.  It was supposed that by taking him to that place it would be for the better, but all was in vain.  He sunk slowly and it was evident that the end was drawing nigh.

On Monday morning he had another severe chill which greatly weakened him.  Toward noon, however, he rallied and throughout the afternoon he rested and slept.  During the day he called for a looking-glass, and, having gazed into it, observed that it was strange that he could look so bright and be so weak.  In the evening, he died.  The news of his death, though not unexpected, was received throughout the country with the greatest sympathy.

President Garfield was born in the village of Orange, near Cleveland, Ohio, November 19, 1831.  His parents were both of New England extraction.  His father, Abraham Garfield, was born in Otsego county, N. Y., but his family had lived in Massachusetts for generations.  James was the youngest of four sons, and his father died in 1833, when the deceased President was scarcely two years old, leaving his children dependent solely on the mother.

The President’s remains were removed to Washington on Wednesday, where they lie in state in the rotunda of the Capitol until Friday.  A religious service will be held previous to the departure to the West.  A special train bearing the President’s family will leave for Cleveland, O., to-day. (Friday) and the funeral and interment will take place on Monday next.  He will be buried in Lake View Cemetery.
~ The Lititz Record, 23-Sept-1881, Page 2, Column 2

You can visit the memorial page for James Abram Garfield.