Sunday, July 22, 2018

Glen, William - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
NORFOLK, June 2d. 1774.
AS the SUBSCRIBER intends leaving the COLONY soon, those who have any Demands against him, are desired to give in their Claims, that they may be Adjusted.
WILLIAM GLEN
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Gray, Robert - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
TO BE LET ON CHARTER TO any PART of Europe, or the West-Indies,
The Brigantine, HAMILTON,

A New Vessel, now on the Stocks, and will be ready to take on Board by the 20th, Instant.
ROBERT GRAY & CO.
N. B.  We have for Sale Barrelled <sic> Pork, Beef, Herrings; Also, Salt Butter in Firkins; Hogs Lard in small Kegs, and a quantity of Jamaica Coffee.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Forsyth, William - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
NORFOLK, June 6, 1774.
JOURNEYMEN Shoemakers well Recommended, by applying to the SUBSCRIBER, will meet with the best Encouragement.
WILLIAM FORSYTH.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Wilson, Christopher - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
NORFOLK, June 6, 1774
For CHARTER to any Port of Europe.  The Sloop GRACE and SALLY, Christopher Wilson, Master: Will carry about Six Thousand Bushels of Grain, in her Lower Hold, and 300 or 350 Barrels between Decks.-----For Terms, Apply to
GILCHRIST & TAYLOR.
N. B.  She has, two Decks laid For a and Aft.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Hudson, Thomas - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
NORFOLK, June 7, 1774.
I INTEND leaving this COLONY soon.
THOMAS HUDSON.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Mitchell, John - 1774

ADVERTISEMENTS
PORTSMOUTH, June 7, 1774
THE SUBSCRIBERS have for SALE.
WEST INDIA and CONTINENT Rum, Muscovado, and Loaf Sugar, Tenerife Wine Molasses and Coffee.
John Mitchell & Co.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 3

Wright, James - 1774

CHARLES TOWN
ON Sunday last arrived here from Georgia, David Taitt, Esq; Commissary of Indian Affairs for the Creek Nation appointed by the Honourable John Stuart, Superintendant, &c.  Mr. Taitt brought the Deputies from that Nation formerly mentioned, to Savannah and informs us, “That the said Deputies, named Emist figno and Neathlacco, Chiefs of the Creek Indians, upon their Arrival seemed much disappointed that the Superintendant was not there.  His Excellency Sir James Wright, Baronet, wrote immediately to Mr. Stuart, giving him Notice of their Arrivval; but the Governour’s <sic> letter bent sent by a Gentleman who had some business to transact at Beaufort, did not reach Mr. Stuart’s hands till April 13th, six Days after its Date.”

The Superintendant immediately dispatched an Express to Georgia, set out himself on the 17th, and arrived at Savannah on the 19th, before which, Sir James Wright had finished his Conferences with the Indians, who were impatient to return home, in order to prevent any evil consequences that might balaproly <sic> arise from the Murder of their countryman, named the Mad Turkey, by Thomas Fee at Augusta and which they had not hard of until coming to savanah; <sic> they determined, nevertheless, to wait for the Superintendant, who met them at Sir James Wright’s House on wednesday, <sic> April 20th, when he confirmed the Governour’s <sic> Talks to them in every Kespect; <sic> having fully conferred with them respecting the late Murders, and Messages sent them by the Cherokee Indians, dismissed them, after the Conference had lasted about three hours, in all Appearance very well satisfied.  The same Day the Deputies set out on their Return to the Nation and escorted beyond Ogcechie by a detachment of the Grenadier and light Infantry Companies of Militia.”
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 2

Stuart, John - 1774

CHARLES TOWN
ON Sunday last arrived here from Georgia, David Taitt, Esq; Commissary of Indian Affairs for the Creek Nation appointed by the Honourable John Stuart, Superintendant, &c.  Mr. Taitt brought the Deputies from that Nation formerly mentioned, to Savannah and informs us, “That the said Deputies, named Emist figno and Neathlacco, Chiefs of the Creek Indians, upon their Arrival seemed much disappointed that the Superintendant was not there.  His Excellency Sir James Wright, Baronet, wrote immediately to Mr. Stuart, giving him Notice of their Arrivval; but the Governour’s <sic> letter bent sent by a Gentleman who had some business to transact at Beaufort, did not reach Mr. Stuart’s hands till April 13th, six Days after its Date.”

The Superintendant immediately dispatched an Express to Georgia, set out himself on the 17th, and arrived at Savannah on the 19th, before which, Sir James Wright had finished his Conferences with the Indians, who were impatient to return home, in order to prevent any evil consequences that might balaproly <sic> arise from the Murder of their countryman, named the Mad Turkey, by Thomas Fee at Augusta and which they had not hard of until coming to savanah; <sic> they determined, nevertheless, to wait for the Superintendant, who met them at Sir James Wright’s House on wednesday, <sic> April 20th, when he confirmed the Governour’s <sic> Talks to them in every Kespect; <sic> having fully conferred with them respecting the late Murders, and Messages sent them by the Cherokee Indians, dismissed them, after the Conference had lasted about three hours, in all Appearance very well satisfied.  The same Day the Deputies set out on their Return to the Nation and escorted beyond Ogcechie by a detachment of the Grenadier and light Infantry Companies of Militia.”
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 2

Taitt, David - 1774

CHARLES TOWN
ON Sunday last arrived here from Georgia, David Taitt, Esq; Commissary of Indian Affairs for the Creek Nation appointed by the Honourable John Stuart, Superintendant, &c.  Mr. Taitt brought the Deputies from that Nation formerly mentioned, to Savannah and informs us, “That the said Deputies, named Emist figno and Neathlacco, Chiefs of the Creek Indians, upon their Arrival seemed much disappointed that the Superintendant was not there.  His Excellency Sir James Wright, Baronet, wrote immediately to Mr. Stuart, giving him Notice of their Arrivval; but the Governour’s <sic> letter bent sent by a Gentleman who had some business to transact at Beaufort, did not reach Mr. Stuart’s hands till April 13th, six Days after its Date.”

The Superintendant immediately dispatched an Express to Georgia, set out himself on the 17th, and arrived at Savannah on the 19th, before which, Sir James Wright had finished his Conferences with the Indians, who were impatient to return home, in order to prevent any evil consequences that might balaproly <sic> arise from the Murder of their countryman, named the Mad Turkey, by Thomas Fee at Augusta and which they had not hard of until coming to savanah; <sic> they determined, nevertheless, to wait for the Superintendant, who met them at Sir James Wright’s House on wednesday, <sic> April 20th, when he confirmed the Governour’s <sic> Talks to them in every Kespect; <sic> having fully conferred with them respecting the late Murders, and Messages sent them by the Cherokee Indians, dismissed them, after the Conference had lasted about three hours, in all Appearance very well satisfied.  The same Day the Deputies set out on their Return to the Nation and escorted beyond Ogcechie by a detachment of the Grenadier and light Infantry Companies of Militia.”
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 2

Fee, Thomas - 1774

CHARLES TOWN
HIS Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has been pleased to prorogue the General Assembly of this Province to Tuesday the seventh Day of June next.

Thomas Fee, who murdered the Creek Indian named Mad Turkey, at Augusta, for the apprehending of whom considerable Rewards were offered by the Governor of Georgia, the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province, and the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, was taken up and committed to the Gaol at Ninety-Six; and on Saturday: April 30th, a Number of armed men came to the said Gaol and demanded the Keys of the Gaol, threatening him with Death if he did not immediately comply with their Commands, but he absolutely refusing to give up the Keys, they broke open the Doors of the Gaol, took out Thomas Fee, freed him from his Irons, mounted him on a Horse, and carried him clear off.  We are sorry to learn, that this daring Breach of the Laws meet with the approbation of many people in that Part of the Country, not-withstanding he vary fatal Consequences which in all probability will result from it.
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 2


CHARLES TOWN
ON Sunday last arrived here from Georgia, David Taitt, Esq; Commissary of Indian Affairs for the Creek Nation appointed by the Honourable John Stuart, Superintendant, &c.  Mr. Taitt brought the Deputies from that Nation formerly mentioned, to Savannah and informs us, “That the said Deputies, named Emist figno and Neathlacco, Chiefs of the Creek Indians, upon their Arrival seemed much disappointed that the Superintendant was not there.  His Excellency Sir James Wright, Baronet, wrote immediately to Mr. Stuart, giving him Notice of their Arrivval; but the Governour’s <sic> letter bent sent by a Gentleman who had some business to transact at Beaufort, did not reach Mr. Stuart’s hands till April 13th, six Days after its Date.”

The Superintendant immediately dispatched an Express to Georgia, set out himself on the 17th, and arrived at Savannah on the 19th, before which, Sir James Wright had finished his Conferences with the Indians, who were impatient to return home, in order to prevent any evil consequences that might balaproly <sic> arise from the Murder of their countryman, named the Mad Turkey, by Thomas Fee at Augusta and which they had not hard of until coming to savanah; <sic> they determined, nevertheless, to wait for the Superintendant, who met them at Sir James Wright’s House on wednesday, <sic> April 20th, when he confirmed the Governour’s <sic> Talks to them in every Kespect; <sic> having fully conferred with them respecting the late Murders, and Messages sent them by the Cherokee Indians, dismissed them, after the Conference had lasted about three hours, in all Appearance very well satisfied.  The same Day the Deputies set out on their Return to the Nation and escorted beyond Ogcechie by a detachment of the Grenadier and light Infantry Companies of Militia.”
~ Virginia Gazette, 09-Jun-1774, Page 3, Column 2