Saturday, July 22, 2017

Madara, Josephine - 1914

Happenings 30 Years Ago
Activities Of Our Citizens Three Decades Ago
From the Bellwood Bulletin, September 24th, 1914.

Miss Josephine Madara, of Main street is seriously ill.  Her niece, Mrs. Wiggins Thorne, of Trenton, N. J. is at her bedside.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 5

You can visit the memorial page for Josephine Madara, or the second memorial page for Josephine Madara.

Burkholder, Thomas G. - 1943

Corporal Guy C. Burkholder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Burkholder, has been elevated to the grade of sergeant with the United States remount at Fort Robinson Neb.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkholder have another son in the service, Thomas Burkholder, who is with the United States engineers in the south.  Both boys are graduates of the Bellwood Antis High school, Sergeant Burkholder for years being identified with troop B, 104th cavalry of Tyrone.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Thomas G. Burkholder.

Burkholder, Helen Elizabeth [Estep] - 1943

Corporal Guy C. Burkholder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Burkholder, has been elevated to the grade of sergeant with the United States remount at Fort Robinson Neb.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkholder have another son in the service, Thomas Burkholder, who is with the United States engineers in the south.  Both boys are graduates of the Bellwood Antis High school, Sergeant Burkholder for years being identified with troop B, 104th cavalry of Tyrone.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Helen Elizabeth [Estep] Burkholder.

Burkholder, Thomas Abraham - 1943

Corporal Guy C. Burkholder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Burkholder, has been elevated to the grade of sergeant with the United States remount at Fort Robinson Neb.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkholder have another son in the service, Thomas Burkholder, who is with the United States engineers in the south.  Both boys are graduates of the Bellwood Antis High school, Sergeant Burkholder for years being identified with troop B, 104th cavalry of Tyrone.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Thomas Abraham Burkholder.

Burkholder, Guy E. - 1943

Corporal Guy C. Burkholder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Burkholder, has been elevated to the grade of sergeant with the United States remount at Fort Robinson Neb.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkholder have another son in the service, Thomas Burkholder, who is with the United States engineers in the south.  Both boys are graduates of the Bellwood Antis High school, Sergeant Burkholder for years being identified with troop B, 104th cavalry of Tyrone.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Guy E. Burkholder.

Hostler, Helen - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

Carlone, John J. (Mrs,) - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

Berkstresser, Raymond (Mrs.) - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

Hostler, Howard - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

Hostler, Reuben - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

Hostler, Florence [Baker] - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Florence [Baker] Hostler.

Hostler, Ernest Kyle - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Ernest Kyle Hostler.

Hostler, Charlotte [Burkett] - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for Charlotte Hostler.

Hostler, George Warren - 1943

Bellwood Soldier Missing
George W. Hostler Falls in North Africa

The tragedy of war has again been forcibly brought home to Bellwood when a message was received from the war department at Washington on March 13, addressed to Mrs. Charlotte Hostler of Tyrone, that her husband, George Warren Hostler, was missing in action in North Africa.  The young man was a native of the borough where he resided all his life and where he spent his boyhood days and was educated in our public schools.

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hostler of 815 North Fourth street and united in marriage to Charlotte Burket of Tyrone.

He entered the armed service of the nation on July 3, 1942, and after receiving training went overseas in November of the same year.  For a period of time he was employed as clerk inone <sic> of the local stores and at the time of his enlistment had been employed in the South Altoona shops of the Pennsylvania railroad company.  He was a well known and likable young man of the borough and had many friends.

He has two brothers and three sisters, Reuben Hostler of Baltimore, Md., Howard Hostler of Bellwood, Mrs. Raymond Berkstresser of Spruce Creek, Mrs. John J. Carlone of Chicago, Ill., and Helen Hostler, at home with the parents in Bellwood.

The father is employed at present by the Pennsylvania railroad at the reclamation plant at Chambersburg.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 4

You can visit the memorial page for George Warren Hostler.

Slep, Eugene Gilland - 1943

Presbyterian Church
Rev. Eugene Gilland Slep, pastor.  Sunday services with the pastor in charge of the preaching services.  The sermon in the morning, “I Need”.  In the evening, “The Churches Place”.  Youth Vespers at 6:30.  Noonday Lenten services.  Prayer meeting at 7:30 Wednesday evening.  Dedication of Pledges on Sunday.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

McCarty. Warren C. - 1943

American Legion Celebrate
Twenty-Fourth Anniversary Of Anderson Post
There was a splendid attendance Monday evening in the American Legion rooms when John M. Anderson Post, No. 424, American Legion and its splendid Ladies Auxiliary observed the American Legion’s 24th birthday.  Past Commander C. F. Wertz opened the ceremonial session after which Post Commander J. L. Shirey presided and introduced speakers of the evening, the one William Robert Fuoss, war veteran from Tyrone, prominent platform speaker; the other, Warren C. McCarty, Claysburg, 21st district American Legion commander.

Ladies of the Auxiliary served a sumptuous repast of pork and sauer kraut.  District Commander McCarty awarded the post the annual membership honors, Anderson Post having gone over the top in the 1943 membership drive, a signal honor for the Bellwood American Legion.

Past Commander Cramer likewise was awarded the badge of his service, a fine recognition for the retiring commander.  Four young ladies rendered several numbers the session closing with the customary flag salute.  Speakers emphasized the American Legion is ready and eager to admit to membership those of World war No. 2, the national by-laws providing for this admittance after the current global war.  He stressed, too, the accomplishments of the national American Legion over a twenty-four year period, Fuoss emphasized the long, hard, up-hill fight to keep the nation prepared, ready as he pointed out “for those eventualities which did come, those things of which our pacifist friends professed to sense neither fear of nor interest in”.

McCarty spoke intimately of the Legion program of yesterday, today and tomorrow, stressing among other things, ‘we are offering a program designed not alone to win the war but to keep the peace”.  Fuoss, in vigorous manner, appealed for the spirit of tolerance in approaching problems of the post-war world, insisting “it will be well for nations and statesmen to forget revenge this trip if we are to avert an even worse war than the present, the horror of World war No. 3”.

“We will do well to get things in logical sequences”, the Tyrone man said.  “There’s a good slogan for the Legion to follow ‘First Things First’.  It is sheer folly to count chickens before eggs hatch, equally absurd to put the cart ahead of the horse.  We need not worry about the post-war world if we lose this war and that, therefore, is the soundest possible reason for our bending every effort to win it”.

“The American Legion”, McCarty ventured. “is concerned with not alone winning of the war but the perfecting of plans for a just and lasting peace, an honorable peace and that don’t mean ‘peace at any price’.  Those who advocated that for the past twenty some years and apparently did not know they were advocating it, well, they were the ones who helped bring about this current global struggle.  A just peace is one thing, a dishonorable peace quite another”.

“It is of no moment to me”, Fuoss said, “what we name the peace structure of tomorrow.  My principal concern is that it shall be a working, going proposition-a united effort of free nations designed to put an end to this business of killing off each other at periods of from twenty-five to thirty years.  The boys who serve today want a just peace and it must be just if it is to endure.  We are remiss of our duty if we fail to give to them what they want and to a just and enduring peace they are entitled, as are all peoples, here and everywhere in this world”.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

Fuoss, William Robert - 1943

American Legion Celebrate
Twenty-Fourth Anniversary Of Anderson Post
There was a splendid attendance Monday evening in the American Legion rooms when John M. Anderson Post, No. 424, American Legion and its splendid Ladies Auxiliary observed the American Legion’s 24th birthday.  Past Commander C. F. Wertz opened the ceremonial session after which Post Commander J. L. Shirey presided and introduced speakers of the evening, the one William Robert Fuoss, war veteran from Tyrone, prominent platform speaker; the other, Warren C. McCarty, Claysburg, 21st district American Legion commander.

Ladies of the Auxiliary served a sumptuous repast of pork and sauer kraut.  District Commander McCarty awarded the post the annual membership honors, Anderson Post having gone over the top in the 1943 membership drive, a signal honor for the Bellwood American Legion.

Past Commander Cramer likewise was awarded the badge of his service, a fine recognition for the retiring commander.  Four young ladies rendered several numbers the session closing with the customary flag salute.  Speakers emphasized the American Legion is ready and eager to admit to membership those of World war No. 2, the national by-laws providing for this admittance after the current global war.  He stressed, too, the accomplishments of the national American Legion over a twenty-four year period, Fuoss emphasized the long, hard, up-hill fight to keep the nation prepared, ready as he pointed out “for those eventualities which did come, those things of which our pacifist friends professed to sense neither fear of nor interest in”.

McCarty spoke intimately of the Legion program of yesterday, today and tomorrow, stressing among other things, ‘we are offering a program designed not alone to win the war but to keep the peace”.  Fuoss, in vigorous manner, appealed for the spirit of tolerance in approaching problems of the post-war world, insisting “it will be well for nations and statesmen to forget revenge this trip if we are to avert an even worse war than the present, the horror of World war No. 3”.

“We will do well to get things in logical sequences”, the Tyrone man said.  “There’s a good slogan for the Legion to follow ‘First Things First’.  It is sheer folly to count chickens before eggs hatch, equally absurd to put the cart ahead of the horse.  We need not worry about the post-war world if we lose this war and that, therefore, is the soundest possible reason for our bending every effort to win it”.

“The American Legion”, McCarty ventured. “is concerned with not alone winning of the war but the perfecting of plans for a just and lasting peace, an honorable peace and that don’t mean ‘peace at any price’.  Those who advocated that for the past twenty some years and apparently did not know they were advocating it, well, they were the ones who helped bring about this current global struggle.  A just peace is one thing, a dishonorable peace quite another”.

“It is of no moment to me”, Fuoss said, “what we name the peace structure of tomorrow.  My principal concern is that it shall be a working, going proposition-a united effort of free nations designed to put an end to this business of killing off each other at periods of from twenty-five to thirty years.  The boys who serve today want a just peace and it must be just if it is to endure.  We are remiss of our duty if we fail to give to them what they want and to a just and enduring peace they are entitled, as are all peoples, here and everywhere in this world”.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

Shirey, J. L. - 1943

American Legion Celebrate
Twenty-Fourth Anniversary Of Anderson Post
There was a splendid attendance Monday evening in the American Legion rooms when John M. Anderson Post, No. 424, American Legion and its splendid Ladies Auxiliary observed the American Legion’s 24th birthday.  Past Commander C. F. Wertz opened the ceremonial session after which Post Commander J. L. Shirey presided and introduced speakers of the evening, the one William Robert Fuoss, war veteran from Tyrone, prominent platform speaker; the other, Warren C. McCarty, Claysburg, 21st district American Legion commander.

Ladies of the Auxiliary served a sumptuous repast of pork and sauer kraut.  District Commander McCarty awarded the post the annual membership honors, Anderson Post having gone over the top in the 1943 membership drive, a signal honor for the Bellwood American Legion.

Past Commander Cramer likewise was awarded the badge of his service, a fine recognition for the retiring commander.  Four young ladies rendered several numbers the session closing with the customary flag salute.  Speakers emphasized the American Legion is ready and eager to admit to membership those of World war No. 2, the national by-laws providing for this admittance after the current global war.  He stressed, too, the accomplishments of the national American Legion over a twenty-four year period, Fuoss emphasized the long, hard, up-hill fight to keep the nation prepared, ready as he pointed out “for those eventualities which did come, those things of which our pacifist friends professed to sense neither fear of nor interest in”.

McCarty spoke intimately of the Legion program of yesterday, today and tomorrow, stressing among other things, ‘we are offering a program designed not alone to win the war but to keep the peace”.  Fuoss, in vigorous manner, appealed for the spirit of tolerance in approaching problems of the post-war world, insisting “it will be well for nations and statesmen to forget revenge this trip if we are to avert an even worse war than the present, the horror of World war No. 3”.

“We will do well to get things in logical sequences”, the Tyrone man said.  “There’s a good slogan for the Legion to follow ‘First Things First’.  It is sheer folly to count chickens before eggs hatch, equally absurd to put the cart ahead of the horse.  We need not worry about the post-war world if we lose this war and that, therefore, is the soundest possible reason for our bending every effort to win it”.

“The American Legion”, McCarty ventured. “is concerned with not alone winning of the war but the perfecting of plans for a just and lasting peace, an honorable peace and that don’t mean ‘peace at any price’.  Those who advocated that for the past twenty some years and apparently did not know they were advocating it, well, they were the ones who helped bring about this current global struggle.  A just peace is one thing, a dishonorable peace quite another”.

“It is of no moment to me”, Fuoss said, “what we name the peace structure of tomorrow.  My principal concern is that it shall be a working, going proposition-a united effort of free nations designed to put an end to this business of killing off each other at periods of from twenty-five to thirty years.  The boys who serve today want a just peace and it must be just if it is to endure.  We are remiss of our duty if we fail to give to them what they want and to a just and enduring peace they are entitled, as are all peoples, here and everywhere in this world”.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

Wertz, C. F. - 1943

American Legion Celebrate
Twenty-Fourth Anniversary Of Anderson Post
There was a splendid attendance Monday evening in the American Legion rooms when John M. Anderson Post, No. 424, American Legion and its splendid Ladies Auxiliary observed the American Legion’s 24th birthday.  Past Commander C. F. Wertz opened the ceremonial session after which Post Commander J. L. Shirey presided and introduced speakers of the evening, the one William Robert Fuoss, war veteran from Tyrone, prominent platform speaker; the other, Warren C. McCarty, Claysburg, 21st district American Legion commander.

Ladies of the Auxiliary served a sumptuous repast of pork and sauer kraut.  District Commander McCarty awarded the post the annual membership honors, Anderson Post having gone over the top in the 1943 membership drive, a signal honor for the Bellwood American Legion.

Past Commander Cramer likewise was awarded the badge of his service, a fine recognition for the retiring commander.  Four young ladies rendered several numbers the session closing with the customary flag salute.  Speakers emphasized the American Legion is ready and eager to admit to membership those of World war No. 2, the national by-laws providing for this admittance after the current global war.  He stressed, too, the accomplishments of the national American Legion over a twenty-four year period, Fuoss emphasized the long, hard, up-hill fight to keep the nation prepared, ready as he pointed out “for those eventualities which did come, those things of which our pacifist friends professed to sense neither fear of nor interest in”.

McCarty spoke intimately of the Legion program of yesterday, today and tomorrow, stressing among other things, ‘we are offering a program designed not alone to win the war but to keep the peace”.  Fuoss, in vigorous manner, appealed for the spirit of tolerance in approaching problems of the post-war world, insisting “it will be well for nations and statesmen to forget revenge this trip if we are to avert an even worse war than the present, the horror of World war No. 3”.

“We will do well to get things in logical sequences”, the Tyrone man said.  “There’s a good slogan for the Legion to follow ‘First Things First’.  It is sheer folly to count chickens before eggs hatch, equally absurd to put the cart ahead of the horse.  We need not worry about the post-war world if we lose this war and that, therefore, is the soundest possible reason for our bending every effort to win it”.

“The American Legion”, McCarty ventured. “is concerned with not alone winning of the war but the perfecting of plans for a just and lasting peace, an honorable peace and that don’t mean ‘peace at any price’.  Those who advocated that for the past twenty some years and apparently did not know they were advocating it, well, they were the ones who helped bring about this current global struggle.  A just peace is one thing, a dishonorable peace quite another”.

“It is of no moment to me”, Fuoss said, “what we name the peace structure of tomorrow.  My principal concern is that it shall be a working, going proposition-a united effort of free nations designed to put an end to this business of killing off each other at periods of from twenty-five to thirty years.  The boys who serve today want a just peace and it must be just if it is to endure.  We are remiss of our duty if we fail to give to them what they want and to a just and enduring peace they are entitled, as are all peoples, here and everywhere in this world”.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

Anderson, John M. - 1943

American Legion Celebrate
Twenty-Fourth Anniversary Of Anderson Post
There was a splendid attendance Monday evening in the American Legion rooms when John M. Anderson Post, No. 424, American Legion and its splendid Ladies Auxiliary observed the American Legion’s 24th birthday.  Past Commander C. F. Wertz opened the ceremonial session after which Post Commander J. L. Shirey presided and introduced speakers of the evening, the one William Robert Fuoss, war veteran from Tyrone, prominent platform speaker; the other, Warren C. McCarty, Claysburg, 21st district American Legion commander.

Ladies of the Auxiliary served a sumptuous repast of pork and sauer kraut.  District Commander McCarty awarded the post the annual membership honors, Anderson Post having gone over the top in the 1943 membership drive, a signal honor for the Bellwood American Legion.

Past Commander Cramer likewise was awarded the badge of his service, a fine recognition for the retiring commander.  Four young ladies rendered several numbers the session closing with the customary flag salute.  Speakers emphasized the American Legion is ready and eager to admit to membership those of World war No. 2, the national by-laws providing for this admittance after the current global war.  He stressed, too, the accomplishments of the national American Legion over a twenty-four year period, Fuoss emphasized the long, hard, up-hill fight to keep the nation prepared, ready as he pointed out “for those eventualities which did come, those things of which our pacifist friends professed to sense neither fear of nor interest in”.

McCarty spoke intimately of the Legion program of yesterday, today and tomorrow, stressing among other things, ‘we are offering a program designed not alone to win the war but to keep the peace”.  Fuoss, in vigorous manner, appealed for the spirit of tolerance in approaching problems of the post-war world, insisting “it will be well for nations and statesmen to forget revenge this trip if we are to avert an even worse war than the present, the horror of World war No. 3”.

“We will do well to get things in logical sequences”, the Tyrone man said.  “There’s a good slogan for the Legion to follow ‘First Things First’.  It is sheer folly to count chickens before eggs hatch, equally absurd to put the cart ahead of the horse.  We need not worry about the post-war world if we lose this war and that, therefore, is the soundest possible reason for our bending every effort to win it”.

“The American Legion”, McCarty ventured. “is concerned with not alone winning of the war but the perfecting of plans for a just and lasting peace, an honorable peace and that don’t mean ‘peace at any price’.  Those who advocated that for the past twenty some years and apparently did not know they were advocating it, well, they were the ones who helped bring about this current global struggle.  A just peace is one thing, a dishonorable peace quite another”.

“It is of no moment to me”, Fuoss said, “what we name the peace structure of tomorrow.  My principal concern is that it shall be a working, going proposition-a united effort of free nations designed to put an end to this business of killing off each other at periods of from twenty-five to thirty years.  The boys who serve today want a just peace and it must be just if it is to endure.  We are remiss of our duty if we fail to give to them what they want and to a just and enduring peace they are entitled, as are all peoples, here and everywhere in this world”.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 2

Snowberger, Ella M. - 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Way, Charles M. - 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Butler, Carl D. - 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Brumbaugh, Dan S. - 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Dickson, Joseph A. - 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Bolger, Herbert S.- 1943

County Funds Invested
The Blair county sinking fund commission met Monday at the Hollidaysburg courthouse and voted to invest the sum of $56,000 in war savings bonds which will yield interest of 2 ½ per cent.

The money which now will go to aid war effort had been “ear-marked” in January of this year for the redemption of all outstanding institution district bonds.  However, the holders of the bonds need not surrender them and now the money for this purpose has been invested to bring some revenue to the county.

Present at the sinking fund meeting were Commissioners Herbert S. Bolger, Joseph A. Dickson and Dan S. Brumbaugh, Controller Carl D. Butler and Treasurer Charles M. Way.

The county retirement board which began its official functions when the system was inaugurated the first of this year, also met and voted to invest $29,000 from its treasury in the war savings bonds from which the yield will be 2 ½ per cent.  This board comprises Messrs. Bolger and Butler and Miss Ella M. Snowberger.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Enyeart, Bruce - 1943

Local News Column
Short Items That Will Interest Our Readers
Mrs. Shaner, of Hersheytown, who has been seriously ill for a number of months, was admitted to the Altoona hospital one day last week as a medical patient.  Mr. Bruce Enyeart, of Niagara Falls N. Y., was called to Bellwood on account of the dangerous condition of his mother.  Mr. Enyeart was accompanied to Bellwood by his wife and family.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Shaner, Mrs. - 1943

Local News Column
Short Items That Will Interest Our Readers
Mrs. Shaner, of Hersheytown, who has been seriously ill for a number of months, was admitted to the Altoona hospital one day last week as a medical patient.  Mr. Bruce Enyeart, of Niagara Falls N. Y., was called to Bellwood on account of the dangerous condition of his mother.  Mr. Enyeart was accompanied to Bellwood by his wife and family.
~ Bellwood Bulletin, 25-Mar-1943, Page 1, Column 1

Shick, B. M. - 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Kahle, Bertha - 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Vera, Adams - 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Wilson, W. O. - 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Wilson, Day (Mrs.) - 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Blaisdell, J. W. (Rev.) - 1894

White/Deemer
Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville, formerly a student at the Clarion State Normal, and well known by many of our people as a most admirable young lady, was united in marriage to John M. White, Esq., a prominent young attorney of the same place, Wednesday evening of this week. The ceremony took place in the M. E. church and was witnessed by a very large assembly of relatives and friends, Rev. J. W. Blaisdell, the pastor, officiating.  After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of the bride’s parents which was attended by quite a large company.  The numerous friends of Miss Deemer in this place will join in the most cordial congratulations and good wishes for herself and husband.
~ Clarion Democrat, June 7, 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

White, John M. - 1894

White/Deemer
Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville, formerly a student at the Clarion State Normal, and well known by many of our people as a most admirable young lady, was united in marriage to John M. White, Esq., a prominent young attorney of the same place, Wednesday evening of this week. The ceremony took place in the M. E. church and was witnessed by a very large assembly of relatives and friends, Rev. J. W. Blaisdell, the pastor, officiating.  After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of the bride’s parents which was attended by quite a large company.  The numerous friends of Miss Deemer in this place will join in the most cordial congratulations and good wishes for herself and husband.
~ Clarion Democrat, June 7, 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894

Deemer, Nora E. - 1894

White/Deemer
Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville, formerly a student at the Clarion State Normal, and well known by many of our people as a most admirable young lady, was united in marriage to John M. White, Esq., a prominent young attorney of the same place, Wednesday evening of this week. The ceremony took place in the M. E. church and was witnessed by a very large assembly of relatives and friends, Rev. J. W. Blaisdell, the pastor, officiating.  After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of the bride’s parents which was attended by quite a large company.  The numerous friends of Miss Deemer in this place will join in the most cordial congratulations and good wishes for herself and husband.
~ Clarion Democrat, June 7, 1894

White/Deemer
John M. White, Esq., and Miss Nora E. Deemer, of Brookville were happily wed in the M. E. church of that place Wednesday evening of this week.  Five hundred people witnessed the beautiful ceremony.  He persons present from Clarion were Mrs. Day Wilson, W. O. Wilson, Adams Vera, Miss Bertha Kahle, and B. M. Shick.  The reception at the home of the bride was in keeping with the wedding ceremony at the church.
~ Clarion Jacksonian, June 7, 1894